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Problem Paradise

Solutions

1 - Yuu Funayama
Retract -1. Bh4-e8! and Black previous move must have been -1 ... e7-e5, so that forward 1. d5xe6 ep # is possible.

The try -1. Bf6-e8? allows -1 .. Ke7-f7 -2. Bg5xRf6+ R..-f6+ -2. Bf4-g5+ so that -1 ... e7-e5 is not established.

2 - Hitoshi Yanami
1. d3 b5 2. Bg5 b4 3. e3 b3 4. Be2 bxa2 5. Bh5 axb1=B 6. Qg4 Ba2 7. Ne2 Bd5 8. O-O Bf3 9. gxf3

3 - Hitoshi Yanami
1. b4 a5 2. Bb2 a4 3. Bd4 a3 4. Ba7 b6 5. Nc3 Bb7 6. Qb1 Be4 7. Nd5 Nc6 8. c3 Na5 9. Qd3 c6 10. O-O-O Qc7 11. Re1 O-O-O 12. Kd1 Re8 13. Qa6+ Kd8 14. Qb7

4 - Hitoshi Yanami
Intention: 1. h4 b5 2. Rh3 Bb7 3. Ra3 Bf3 4. e4 Qc8 5. Bc4 Qa6 6. d3 Qh6 7. Qd2 g6 8. Qg5 Bg7 9. Bf4 Bd4 10. Kd2 Be3+ 11. Kc3 Nf6 12. Kb4 O-O 13. Ka5 Nc6+ 14. Ka6 Rfb8 15. Ra5 Kf8 16. a4 Ke8 17. Ra3 Kd8 18. Rc3 Kc8 19. Bb3 Nd8 20. Rc6 Ne8 21. Rf6 Qf8

Unfortunately this is cooked e.g. by 1. h4 b6 2. Rh3 Bb7 3. Ra3 Bf3 4. Ra5 Nc6 5. a4 Qb8 6. Ra3 Kd8 7. Rd3 Kc8 8. Rd6 Kb7 9. e4 g6 10. Bc4 Bg7 11. d3 Bd4 12. Qd2 Nf6 13. Qg5 Qg8 14. Bf4 Qg7 15. Kd2 Be3+ 16. Kc3 Rhb8 17. Bb3 Nd8 18. Kb4 Kc8 19. Kb5 Ne8 20. Ka6 Qf8 21. Rf6 b5 as discovered by Olli Heimo.

Problem Paradise, Winter 1998

H14 - Toshio Kusanagi
Retract -1. f5xBg6. Black captured g7xh6, f7xg6xh5, a7xb6xc5xd4xe3, so his last move wasn't e4-e3. The king, bishop and knight don't have any retro-moves either. The only possible last move is also e7-e5. So #1 with fe6 ep#.

H15 - Hitoshi Yanami
1. Nf3 Nc6 2. Nd4 Ne5 3. Nc6 dc6 4. Rg1 Bh3 5. gh3 Qd3 6. Rg6 hg6 7. cd3 Rh4 8. Qb3 Re4 9. Qb6 Re3 10. fe3 ab6 11. Kf2 Ra3 12. ba3 Nf3 13. Bb2 Ne1 14. Bf6 ef6 15. Kg1

Problem Paradise, Spring 1998

PR01 - Hitoshi Yanami
1. c4 Na6 2. Qa4 Rb8 3. Qc6 bc6 4. Nc3 Rb3 5. ab3 Bb7 6. Ra5 Ba8 7. Rd5 cd5 8. Ne4 de4 9. Nf3 ef3 10. g4 Be4 11. Bg2 fg2 12. h3 gh1=R#

PR02 - Michel Caillaud
1. d4 b5 2. Qd3 Bb7 3. Qg6 hxg6 4. d5 Rh4 5. Bh6 gxh6 6. d6 Bg7 7. dxc7 Bd4 8. cxb8=B Qb6 9. Bf4 O-O-O 10. c4 Ba8 11. c5 Kb7 12. c6+ Ka6 13. c7 Ka5 14. c8=Q Kb4 15. Qc2 Bc5 16. Bc1 Rc4 17. Qd1

PR03 - Hitoshi Yanami
1. d3 d5 2. Bg5 Bf5 3. Nd2 e6 4. Rb1 Ba3 5. ba3 h5 6. Rb3 Bh7 7. Qa1 g6 8. Qh8 d4 9. Kd1 Qd5 10. Kc1 Qg2 11. Kb2 Qh2 12. Bh3 Nd7 13. Bg4 Ndf6 14. Nh3 Kd7 15. Rc1 Nh6 16. Qa8 b5 17. Qh1 Bg8 18. Qd1 Kc6 19, Nf1 Kb6

PR04 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. a4 c5 2. a5 Qb6 3. ab6 a5 4. Ra3 a4 5. Rf3 a3 6. b4 a2 7. Bb2 a1=N 8. Be5 Nb3 9. cb3 c4 10. Qc2 c3 11. Qa2 c2 12. Rf5 c1=N 13. Bf4 Nd3 14. ed3 e5 15. d4 e4 16. Bb5 e3 17. d3 e2 18. Kd2 e1=N 19. Ne2 Nf3 20. gf3 g5 21. Rc1 g4 22. Rcc5 g3 23. Kc3 g2 24. Kc4 g1=Q 25. Nbc3 Qg5 26. Ng3 Qd8 27. Rce5

Problem Paradise 10, Summer 1998

PR05 - Yuji Kikuta
(a)1. d4 Nc6 2. Qd2 Rb8 3. Qh6 gh6 4. d5 Bg7 5. dc6 Kf8 6. cd7 Qe8 7. d8=Q Bd4 8. Qd4 c6 9. Qd1
(b)1. d4 Nc6 2. Bh6 gh6 3. d5 Bg7 4. dc6 Kf8 5. cd7 Qe8 6. d8=B Be5 7. Bc7 Bf4 8. Bf4 Rb8 9. Bc1

PR06 - Mark Kirtley
1. a4 g5 2. Ra3 g4 3. Rb3 g3 4. Rb6 axb6 5. f4 Ra5 6. Nf3 Rh5 7. a5 Rh3 8. gxh3 g2 9. a6 g1=R 10. a7 Rg4 11. a8=R Rxf4 12. Ra1 Ra4 13. Ng1 Ra8

Two Phoenix Rooks in a minimal setting.

PR07 - Gianni Donati
1. c4 Na6 2. Qb3 Rb8 3. Qb6 cxb6 4. c5 Qc7 5. c6 Qd6 6. c7 Qc6 7. cxb8=Q Kd8 8. Qa8 Kc7 9. Qxc8+ Kd6 10. Qxf8 Nf6 11. Qg8 h6 12. Qh7 Ra8 13. Qc2 Nb8 14. Qd1

The Phoenix Queen makes an incredible trip.

PR08 - Thierry Le Gleuher
1. g3 a5 2. Bh3 Ra6 3. Kf1 Rh6 4. Kg2 d6 5. Kf3 Qd7 6. Ke4 Qa4+ 7. Kd5 b5 8. Bd7+! Nxd7 9. Kc6 g6 10. Kxc7 Bg7 11. Kc6 Bc3 12. Kd5 Bb4 13. Ke4 Rh3 14. Kf3 h5 15. Kg2 h4 16. Kf1 Rh5 17. Ke1 Rd5

The White King captures on c7!

PR09 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. h4 g5 2. Rh3 Bg7 3. Rd3 Be5 4. Rd6 cxd6 5. Nc3 Qa5 6. Ne4 Qa3 7. bxa3 a5 8. Bb2 Ra6 9. Bd4 Rc6 10. Be3 Rc3 11. dxc3 b6 12. Qd5 Bb7 13. Qe6 fxe6 14. O-O-O Kf7 15. Kb2 Kg6 16. Bc1 Kf5 17. Nd2 Kf4 18. g4 Bg2 19. Ngf3 Bh3 20. Bg2 Nf6 21. Rh1 Rf8 22. Nb1+

Here we have a complex roundabout circuit by both wQB and wQN. This problem is an hard-to-solve puzzle.

PR10 - Thomas Volet
Bl. 3 caps are c7xd6xe5 and g7xf6, hence the promoted bBh1 is from h7. Wh. caps are axbxa7, d2xc3 and hxg for promotion and g8, respecting balance.

Last moves were
-1. Nd4-b5 h2-h1=B
-2. Nf5-d4 h3-h2
-3. Nh6-f5 h4-h3
-4. Ng8-h6 h5-h4
-5. g7-g8=N h6-h5
-6. g6-g7 h7-h6
-7. h5xBg6 Be4-g6
-8. h4-h5 Bc6-e4
-9. Bd7-c8 Bb5-c6
-10. Bc6-d7 etc.
Further unlocking requires
(1) reconducting the wBc6 on f1,
(2) retracting e2-e3,
(3) leading the bBb5 to c8 and wNd1 to c6,
(4) retracting n. Kc5-b6 d7-d6+ etc.

White played last so that mate in 1 is 1... Rc6 #! and not 1. b3 #??

Problem Paradise 11

PR11 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. b4 Na6 2. b5 Rb8 3. ba6 ba6 4. Nh3 Rb3 5. Nf4 Rh3 6. gh3 h5 7. Bg2 Rh6 8. Ba8 Bb7 9. OO Bh1 10. Bg2 c6 11. f3 Qb6 12. Rf2 Qe3 13. Bf1 Bg2 14. de3 Rg6

PR12 - Hitoshi Yanami
1, b4 b6 2. Bb2 b5 3. Bf6 ef6 4. g4 Bd6 5. Bg2 Bg3 6. hg3 d6 7. Rh5 Be6 8. Rc5 dc5 9. Bb7 Qd2 10. Nd2 Ba2 11. Nb3 Ke7 12. Qd8 Ke6 13. OOO Ke5 14. Rd5 Ke4 15. f4 Ke3 16. Nh3 Ke2 17. Rh5 Ke1 18. Qd1

PR13 - Gianni Donati
1. Nc3 e5 2. Rb1 Ba3 3. ba3 g5 4. Rb6 g4 5. Re6 fe6 6. f4 b5 7. f5 Bb7 8. f6 Be4 9. f7 Ke7 10. f8=R Bg6 11. Rf4 Be8 12. Rb4 e4 13. Rb1 b4 14. Ra1 b3 15. Nb1 b2 16. c4 ba1=B 17. c5 Bg7 18. c6 Bf8

H16c - Hitoshi Yanami
1. g3 Na6 2. Bg2 Rb8 3. Bc6 bc6 4. Nf3 Rb3 5. OO Re3 6. de3 d5 7. Qd4 Bf5 8. Rd1 e6 9. Rd3 Qg5 10. Qf6 d4 11. Ra3 d3 12. Ne5 d2 13. f3 d1=R 14. Kf2 Rd4 15. b3 Ra4 16. Bb2 Bb4 17. Bd4 Ne7 18. Nc3 Kd8 19. Rh1 Kc8 20. Ke1 Rd8

Problem Paradise 12

PR16 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. a4 Nc6 2. a5 Rb8 3. a6 ba6 4. Ra4 Rb3 5. Rh4 Rc3 6. dc3 g5 7. Qd6 ed6 8. Be3 Qf6 9. Nd2 Qf3 10. ef3 g4 11. Bd3 g3 12. Ne2 gh2 13. Ng3 h5 14. Ke2 Bh6 15. Ra1 h1=R 16. Raa4 Ra1 17. Rh1 Ra2 18. Ra1 Nd4 19. Ke1 Nb5 20. Rh4 c5 21. Rh1 h4 22. Bf1

PR17 - Michel Caillaud
1. f4 Nc6 2. f5 Rb8 3. f6 ef6 4. a4 Bb4 5. a5 Bc3 6. dc3 Qe7 7. Be3 Qe5 8. Ba7 b6 9. a6 Rb7 10. Bb8 Nge7 11. a7 Rg8 12. a8=B Ra7 13. Bb7 Ra8 14. h4 Na7 15. Be4 d5 16. Bh7 g6 17. h5 Rg7 18. h6 Qh5 19. Bg8 Bf5 20. h7 Nec8 21. h8=Q Rh7 22. Qg7 Rh8 23. Qh7

PR19 - Thomas Volet
Untangling the position requires the following retroplay: -1. .. Bg4-h5 -2. Ka2-b1 Bd8-g5 -3. Ka3-a2 Ba5-d8 -4. Kb4-a3 Bb6-a5 -5. Kc5-b4 Ba5-b6 -6. Kc6-c5 Re7-b7 -7. Qh1-g1 Re5-e7 -8. Qg1-h1 Rf5-e5 -9. Qh1-g1 Rf3-f5 -10. Rg1-g2 Bb6-a5 -11. Qg2-h1 Ba5-b6 -12. Rh1-g1 Bb6-a5 -13. Bg1-f2 Ba5-b6 -14. f2xPe3 and now the black king can escape the a8-h1 diagonal over f4. The white bishop on a8 can go back to f1, and white uncaptures g2xh3.

Problem Paradise 13

R001 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. e4 a5 2. Ba6 b5 3. d3 b4 4. Bf4 b3 5. Bd6 ed6 6. Nc3 Qf6 7. Nd5 Qc3 8. bc3 b2 9. e5 b1=Q 10. e6 Qb4 11. Qf3 Qh4 12. Rd1 Qe8 13. e7 a4 14. ed8=B a3 15. Bg5 f6 16. Bc1

R002 -Ayako Okaya
(a)1. e3 d5 2. Bd3 Bg4 3. Bf5 Qc8 4. Be6 fe6 5. a4 Kf7 6. a5 Kg6 7. a6 Kh5 8. ab7 a5 9. bc8=B Ra6
(b)1. a4 d5 2. a5 Bg4 3. a6 Qc8 4. ab7 a5 5. bc8=B Ra6 6. Be6 fe6 7. e3 Kf7 8. Bb5 Kg6 9. Bd7 Kh5 10. Bc8

R003 - Ayako Okaya
1. d3 e6 2. Bh6 Qh4 3. Qd2 g5 4. Qc3 Bh6 5. Qh8 Kf8 6. Qg7 Kg7 7. Na3 Kh8 8. OOO g4 9. f4 gf3 10. Rd2 fe2 11. g4 ef1=R

R004 - Michel Caillaud
1. h4 d6 2. Rh3 Bf5 3. Rg3 Be4 4. Rg6 f5 5. Rf6 Kd7 6. Rf8 Ke6 7. d3 Qd7 8. Rb8 Kf7 9. Rd8 Qe6 10. Rd7 Rf8 11. Qd2 Ke8 12. Qh6 Rf6 13. Bg5 Rg6 14. Bf6 Rg3 15. f4 Rf3 16. Kd2 Rf1 17. Ke3 Rd1 18. Kf2 Rd2 19. Ke1

R005 - Gianni Donati
1. a4 h5 2. Ra3 Rh6 3. Rd3 Ra6 4. b3 b6 5. Ba3 Bb7 6. Bd6 Be4 7. Na3 Bh7 8. Qa1 g6 9. Qh8 Bg7 10. h4 Bc3 11. Bh2 f6 12. g3 Kf7 13. Bh3 Nh6 14. Be6 de6 15. Nf3 Qd4 16. Rf1 Nd7 17. Bg1 Rg8 18. Nh2 Rg7 19. Qa8 Ng8 20. Qh1

R006 - Thomas Volet
Last moves were for instance -1. .. f7-f5 -2. Rf6-f4 Ba2-b1 -3. Rh6-f6 Bb1-a2 -4. Rh8-h6 Ba2-b1 -5. h7-h8=R Bb1-a2 -6. h6-h7 Ba2-b1 -7. h5-h6 Bb1-a2 -8. h4-h5 h5xRg4 -9. d3-d4 Ba2-b1 -10. Rd4-g4 Bb1-a2 -11. Rd6-d4 Bc7-d8 -12. h3-h4 Bb8-c7 -13. Rd8-d6 Ba7-b8. Further retracting involves c7xPb6; Ba7->a1; b2-b3; Bb1>c8; d7xPe6; and the whole position unlocks easily.

W012 - Akayo Okaya
1. g3 f5 2. g4 f4 3. Bd7 Nd7 4. Nh3 Ne5 5. OO Nf3 6. Kg2 e5 7. Rh1 Ng1 8. Kf1 f3 9. Ke1

Problem Paradise 14

R009 - Allesandro Cuppini
(a): Whatever white's last move was (g7-g8=Q or g7xh8=B are the only two candidates), black's previous move must've been g2xh1=N. This imples that black played d7xe6xf5xg4 and b7xc6xd5xe4xf3xg2xh1. These 9 captures account for all missing white pieces. But all those captures were on white squares, so the bishop on h8 is original. So the last move was g7-g8=Q
(b): Now the method from (a) doesn't work, since black would need too many captures. But by freeing g6, uncapturing a knight on h8 gives black a retro-move! So the last move is g7xNh8=B.

R010 - Stanislav Vokal & Yukio Hirose
(a): Retract Qf1-e1 and mate in 2 with 1. fe7! (2. Qf7/Ng7/Nf6#)[gh5/Rh5/fe6]/Rh7 2. Qf7/Nf6#
(b): Retract b5xa6 ep! Black's move before that must've been a7-a5. Bd5 is clearly promoted. If black may castle, this promotion occurred on g8, after the white d-pawn made 5 captures. Bf8 wasn't among those captures, because it couldn't have escaped f8 until the bishop left the northeast corner, so black could play g6. So one of the captures was the missing rook. So black may no longer castle.
Mate in 2 with 1. Qa5!

R011 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. h4 a5 2. Rh3 a4 3. Rb3 ab3 4. d3 Ra2 5. Nd2 Ra8 6. Ra7 b6 7. Rb7 Ra1 8. Ndf3 Rc1 9. Nh2 Ra1 10. f3 Ra8 11. Qa1 d6 12. Qa7 Nd7 13. Qb8 Ra1 14. Kf2 Rf1 15. Kg3 Ra1 16. Kh3 Ra8

R012 - Michel Caillaud
1. f3 e6 2. f4 Ke7 3. f5 Qe8 4. f6 Kd8 5. c3 d6 6. c4 Kd7 7. c5 Qd8 8. c6 bc6 9. a3 c5 10. Ra2 c6 11. Ra1 Kc7 12. Ra2 Kb7 13. Ra1 Kb6 14. Ra2 Kb5 15. a4 Kb4 16. Ra3 Kc4 17. Rb3 Kd4 18. Rb4 Kd5 19. Rb5 Ke5 20. Rb6 Kf5 21. Rb7 Kg5 22. Rb8 Kh5 23. Rb7 Rb8 24. Rç7 Rb7 25. Rd7 Rb6 26. Re7 Rb5 27. Re8 Rb4 28. Rf8 Rb3 29. Rg8 Ra3 30. Rf8 Rg8 31. Re8 Rf8 32. Re7 Re8 33. Rd7 Re7 34. Rc7 Rd7 35. Rb7 Rc7 36. Rb8 Rb7 37. b3 Rb6 38. Rb7 Rb5 39. Rc7 Rb4 40. Rd7 Rc4 41. Re7 Rc3 42. Re8 Rc2 43. Rf8 Rc1 44. Rg8 Rc2 45. Qc1 Rb2 46. Qc2 Qd7 47. Qc3 Rc2 48. Rh8 Rc1 49. Kf2 Rd1 50. Kf3 Re1 51. Kg3 Rf1 52. Kh3 Rg1 53. g3 Rf1 54. Rg1 Re1 55. Rf1 Rd1 56. Re1 Rc1 57. Rd1 Rc2 58. Rc1 Rb2 59. Rc2 Rba2 60. Rb2 Qc7 61. Qc2 Qb7 62. Qc1 Qb6 63. Qd1 Qb5 64. Qe1 Qb4 65. Qf1

R013 - Akayo Okaya
1. g3 e6 2. Bg2 Qf6 3. Bb7 Qb2 4. Nf3 Qc3 5. dc3 Ke7 6. Be3 Kf6 7. Nbd2 Kf5 8. Rb1 Kg4 9. Rb6 Kh3 10. Ra6 Kg2 11. Bb6 Kh1 12. e3 Kg2 13. Ke2 Kh3 14. Qh1 Kg4 15. Nf1 Kf5 16. N3d2 Kf6 17. Kf3 Ke7 18. Kg4 Ke8 19. f3

R014 - Gianni Donati
1. g4 f5 2. g5 Kf7 3. g6 Kf6 4. gh7 Kg5 5. hg8=N Rh6 6. b4 Re6 7. Nh6 gh6 8. b5 Bg7 9. b6 Bd4 10. ba7 Bb6 11. ab8=N Ra5 12. Na6 ba6 13. Nc3 Bb7 14. Nd5 Qa8 15. Nf6 Bf3 16. Ng8 Bh5 17. Nf3 Kg4 18. Nd4 Qd5 19. Nc6 Rc5 20. Nb8

R015 - Pascal Wassong
1. h4 e5 2. Rh3 e4 3. Rb3 e3 4. Rb6 cb6 5. c4 Qc7 6. c5 Qh2 7. c6 d6 8. c7 Bf5 9. c8=N Nd7 10. Ne7 Ndf6 11. Nd5 OOO 12. Nb4 Kb8 13. Nc2 Bc2

R016 - Mark Kirtley
1. Nf3 Nc6 2. Ne5 Nd4 3. Nc6 Ne2 4. Nb8 Ng3 5. hg3 Nf6 6. Rh7 Ne4 7. Rg7 Nd2 8. Rg8 Nb3 9. Be3 Na1 10. Bd4 Nc2 11. Qc2 Rh1! 12. Qh7 f6 13. Qh2 Kf7 14. Qg1 Rh8
The rook sweeps over the h-line just for a tempo!

W027 - Mark Kirtley
1. Nc3 d6! 2. Nd5 Kd7 3. Ne7 d5 4. Nd5 Ne7 5. Nc3 Rg8 6. Nb1
1. Nf3 e6! 2. Ne5 Ne7 3. Nd7 e5 4. Ne5 Rg8 5. Nf3 Kd7 6. Ng1

Problem Paradise 15

R017 - Thierry le Gleuher
1. Nf3 Nf6 2. Ne5 Ne4 3. Nd7 Nd2 4. Nc5 Bf5 5. f4 Bd3 6. Kf2 Qd4 7. Kg3 Nd7 8. f5 Rd8 9. f6 ef6 10. e4 Ke7 11. Be2 Kd6 12. e5 Kd5 13. Bh5 Bd6 14. Bf6 gf6 15. Re1 Rh2 16. Re4 Rh1 17. Qe2 Rd1
All the black pieces are on the d-line, in order.

R018 - Thierry le Gleuher
1. d4 h5 2. d5 Rh6 3. Qd4 Rg6 4. Qb6 ab6 5. Bd2 Ra3 6. Ba5 Re3 7. Nc3 Rg2 8. Rd1 g5 9. Rd4 g4 10. Rc4 g3 11. Rc6 dc6 12. Nh3 Bf5 13. Nf4 e6 14. h3 Ba3 15. d6 Qf6 16. d7 Ke7 17. d8=R Bh7 18. Rd1 Qd4 19. Ra1 Nf6 20. Nb1 Bg8 21. Bd2 Nh7 22. Bc1
The white rook on a1 is a phoenix!

R019 - Kazuo Watanabe
1. Nc3 f5 2. Ne4 fe4 3. Nf3 ef3 4. Rg1 fe2 5. f4 ed1=B 6. f5 Be2 7. f6 Ba6 8. fg7 Nf6 9. f8=B Bg7 10. Bb3 Nd5 11. Bfc4 Bb2 12. Kf1 Be5 13. Bb2 d6 14. Re1 Bg4 15. Ba1 OO

R020 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. d4 Nf6 2. Bh6 gh6 3. g4 h5 4. g5 Bh6 5. g6 OO 6. g7 Bf4 7. gf8=B Bd6 8. Bh6 Qf8 9. Bc1 Qh6 10. e3 Kg7 11. Ba6 ba6 12. b4 Bb7 13. b5 Be4 14. b6 Nc6 15. b7 Rc8 16. bc8=B a5 17. Ba6 Nd5 18. Bf1
Both white bishops are phoenixes!

R021 - Thomas Volet
The last moves were: -1. .. Ne4-g3 -2. h2-h3 Nd6-e4 -3. Na5-b7 Nb7-d6 -4. Nc4-a5 Bh6-f4 -5. Nd6-c4 Re7-f7 -6. Nf7-d6 Bf8-h6 -7. Rd1-d7 Rd7-e7 -8. Ra1-d1 Bd6-f8 -9. Ba5-c7 Bc7-d6 -10. Bd2-a5 h5-h4 -11. Bc1-d2 h6-h5 -12. d2xe3 and now the position unlocks by unpromoting the uncaptured officer from e3 on g1, retracting the g-pawn to g6, and uncapturing g5xNf6.
Several screen-changes are needed to unlock the mess.
But unfortunately, this is cooked: -5. Nd2-c4 Bf8-h6 -6. Nc4-d2 Bd6-f8 -7. Bb6-c7 Bc7-d6 -8. Nd6-c4 Rg7-f7 and this rook unpromotes, the pawn is brought back to g6, and white uncaptures g5xNf6. This knight allows the rook on d7 to be freed, and the whole position unlocks.

R022 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. Nc3 h5 2. Ne4 h4 3. Ng3 hg3 4. h4 f5 5. Rh2 gh2 6. h5 hg1=B 7. h6 Bh2 8. h7 Bd6 9. hg8=R Rh7 10. Rh8 Ba3 11. Rg8 c5 12. Rh8 Qc7 13. Rg8 Qe5 14. Rh8 d6 15. Rg8 Nd7 16. Rh8 Nb6 17. Rg8 Bd7 18. Rh8 OOO 19. Rg8 Kb8 20. Rh8 Rc8 21. Rg8 Rc6 22. Rh8 Nc8 23. Rg8 Rb6 24. Rh8 Rb3 25. Rg8 Rg3 26. d3 b6 27. Bg5 f4 28. Qd2 f3 29. OOO
The white rook oscillates between g8 and h8, because white needs to maintain his castling rights.

R023 - Gianni Donati
1. e3 b6 2. Qf3 Ba6 3. Qb7 Nc6 4. Bb5 Nb4 5. Bc6 dc6 6. h4 Qd7 7. h5 Rd8 8. h6 Qc8 9. Rh5 Rd3 10. Rd5 Ra3 11. ba3 Nf6 12. Bb2 Nh5 13. Bf6 Bc4 14. Bh4 f6 15. Rd8 Kf7 16. Rf8 Ke6 17. Rf7 Rd8 18. Nf3 Rd3 19. Ke2 Kd7 20. Ne5 Ke8 21. Kf3 Rb3 22. Ke4 Rb1 23. f3 Rf1 24. Rb1 Na6 25. Rb4 Be6 26. Rd4 Qd8 27. c4 Bc8 28. Nd7 Nb8
Four capturefree cycles!

R024 - Ken Kousaka
1. h4 e5 2. Rh3 Ke7 3. Ra3 Kf6 4. Ra6 ba6 5. h5 Bb7 6. h6 Bf3 7. gf3 Ba3 8. Bh3 Ne7 9. Be6 de6 10. f4 Qd3 11. cd3 Rd8 12. Qa4 Rd6 13. Qe4 Nd7 14. Qg6 hg6 15. h7 g5 16. h8=Q Kg6 17. Qh1 Rh8 18. Qa8 Rh7 19. Qh8 Ng8
The white queen makes a big triangle.

R025 - Gianni Donati & Mark Kirtley
1. f3 Nc6 2. Kf2 Nd4 3. Kg3 Ne2 4. Kg4 Nc3 5. dc3 a5 6. Qd4 Ra6 7. Bd3 Rb6 8. Ne2 Rb3 9. ab3 e6! 10. Ra5 e5 11. Qa4 e4 12. c4 e3 13. Nec3 e2 14. Rf1 e1=R 15. Rf2 Re6! 16. Re5 Re7 17. Re7
Twice a tempo on e6.

R026 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. g4 c6 2. g5 Qa5 3. g6 Qc3 4. dc3 Nf6 5. Bg5 Nh5 6. Bf6 gf6 7. g7 d5 8. gf8=B d4 9. Bh6 d3 10. Bc1 h6 11. Bg2 d2 12. Kf1 dc1=Q 13. Bf3 Qd2 14. Kg2 Qd8

Problem Paradise 16

W052 - Ayako Okaya
(a): 1. b4 d6 2. b5 Be6 3. b6 Bd5 4. bc7 e6 5. c8=Q Be7 6. Qc3 Bg5 7. Qf6 gf6
(b): 1. b4 d6 2. b5 Be6 3. b6 Bd5 4. bc7 e6 5. cb8=N Be7 6. Ne7 Bg5 7. Nf6 gf6
(c): 1. b3 d6 2. b4 Be6 3. b5 Bd5 4. b6 e6 5. bc7 Be7 6. cd8=B Bg5 7. Bf6 gf6

W053 - Mark Kirtley
I: 1. b3 Nf6 2. Bb2 Nh5 3. Bf6 gf6 4. c3 Bh6 5. Qc2 Bg7 6. Qg6 hg6 7. d3 Rh7
II: 1. c3 Nf6 2. Qc2 Nh5 3. Qg6 hg6 4. b3 Rh6 5. Bb2 Rh7 6. Bf6 gf6 7. d3 Bg7

R027 - Kazuo Watanabe
1. h4[=bP] Nh6[=wN] 2. Nf5[=bN] Ng3[=wN] 3. Nh3[=bN] hg3 4. gh3 g2[=wP]

R028 - Paul Raican
1. d4 e6 2. d5 Bd6[=N] 3. de6[=N] Ne7[=P] 4. Nd8[=B] Rf8[=B] 5. Bc7[=R] Kd8 6. Rd7[=Q] Nd7[=B] 7. Be3[=N] Bh3[=N] 8. Nd2[=P] Ng1[=B] 9. Rc1[=B] Bf2[=R] 10. Rg1=[B] Rf1[=Q] 11. Nf1[=B] Rb8[=B] 12. Bb6[=N] Bc7[=N] 13. Nc8[=B] Nc8[=B]
However, this is cooked: 1. d4 e5 2. de5[=N] c6 3. Nc6[=B] Bc5[=N] 4. Bd7[=R] Nbd7[=B] 5. Be3[=N] Bh3[=N] 6. Nd2[=P] Ng1[=B] 7. Rc1[=B] Bf2[=R] 8. Rg1[=B] Rf1[=Q] 9. Nf1[=B] Ne7[=P] 10. Bc5[=R] Rf8[=B] 11. Rf5[=B] Rb8[=B] 12. Be6[=N] Bc7[=N] 13. Nd8[=B] Kd8

R029 - Thierry le Gleuher
1. h4 g5 2. Rh3 gh4 3. Rb3 h3 4. Rb7 h2 5. Rb8 hg1=Q 6. Ra8 Qg2 7. Rc8 Qa8 8. Rd8 Qd8

R030 - Thierry le Gleuher
1. h4 Nc6 2. h5 Ne5 3. h6 Ng4 4. hg7 h5 5. Rh3 h4 6. Rg3 hg3 7. c4 Rh1 8. c5 Nh2 9. c6 dc6 10. f4 Bh3 11. f5 e6 12. f6 Nf6 13. g8=R Nh7 14. Rg4 Qh4 15. Rc4 f6 16. d4 Kf7 17. Be3 Kg6 18. Qd3 Kh5 19. Nd2 Bh6 20. Rb1 Rh8
However, this is cooked: 1. h4 Nc6 2. h5 Ne5 3. h6 Nf6 4. hg7 h5 5. Rh3 h4 6. Rg3 hg3 7. c4 Rh1 8. c5 Nh7 9. c6 dc6 10. g8=R Bh3 11. Rg4 e6 12. Rc4 Qh4 13. d4 f6 14. Be3 Kf7 15. f3 Kg6 16. Qd3 Kh5 17. Nd2 Bh6 18. Kd1 Nf3 19. Rb1 Nh2 20. Ke1 Rh8

R031 - Leonid N. Borodatow
White misses four pieces, black's captures are cxbxa, dxe and gxf. Black misses seven pieces, obvious white captures are c2xd3xe4xf5xg6xh7. Black has four different kind of last moves:
g6xf5: White played b2-b3 after the pawn on a2 and the rook on a3 were there. The bishop from c1 was captured by the black d-pawn, and white cross-captured exf and fxe. The white rook must have left the southeast corner via e1, so white can't castle. The black h-pawn was captured on h7, so the black rook from h8 must've escaped the northeast corner via e8. So black can't castle either.
g7xf6: White has no chance to crosscapture to let the rook from h1 out of its cage, so it must've left the southeast corner via e1, so white can't castle. Black can still castle though.
K~ or R~: Black obviously can't castle anymore. White could have cross-captured g2xPh3 and h2xBg3, to let out the rook from h1. So white can still castle.
f7-f6: Same situation as the previous case, but black still has his castle-rights too.

So schematically the castle-rights are:

Last move? White may castle Black may castle
g6xf5 no no
g7xf6 no yes
K~ or R~ yes no
f7-f6 yes yes

R032 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. f4 g5 2. Kf2 Bg7 3. Ke3 Bc3 4. bc3 a5 5. Ba3 Ra6 6. Bc5 Rh6 7. Bd4 Rh3 8. gh3 g4 9. Bg2 g3 10. Be4 g2 11. Nf3 g1=R 12. Bd3 Rg3 13. hg3

R033 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. c4 d5 2. c5 Qd6 3. c6 Qg3 4. hg3 Nd7 5. Rh6 Nb6 6. Rd6 cd6 7. c7 Be6 8. c8=R Kd7 9. Rf8 f5 10. Rf6 Rf8 11. Rh6 Nc8 12. Rh1 h5 13. f3 h4 14. Kf2 h3 15. Ke3 h2 16. Nh3 Rh4 17. Rg1 hg1=Q 18. Kd3 Qb6 19. Nf2 Qd8

Problem Paradise 17, Jan.-Mar. 2000

W068 - Mark Kirtley
I: 1. f4 d5 2. f5 Bd7 3. f6 Bb5 4. fe7 Nc6 5. ed8=R Ke7 6. Rd5 Rc8 7. Rd6 cd6
II: 1. f3 d6 2. f4 Bd7 3. f5 Bb5 4. f6 Nc6 5. fe7 Rc8 6. ed8=R Ke7 7. Rd6 cd6

R034 - Andrei Kornilov & Andrei Frolkin
Retroplay is: -1. c4xNd5 Nf4-d5 -2. a7-a8=N Nh5-f4 -3. a6-a7 Rh1-g1 -4. a5-a6 Rh4-h1 -5. a4-a5 Rd4-h4 -6. a3-a4 Rd5-d4 -7. a2-a3 Ra5-d5 -8. c3-c4 Ra8-a5 -9. c2-c3 a7xNb6 -10. Nc4-b6 Rb8-a8 -11. Nd6-c4 Ra8-b8 -12. Ne8-d6 Rb8-a8 -13. Nd6xQe8. The pawns on e6 and f6 cross-captured to let the white rooks in, and the uncaptured queen screens the black king.

R035 - Ayako Okaya
1. e3 d6 2. Qe2 Be6 3. Qa6 Bc4 4. Bd3 e6 5. Ne2 Qh4 6. OO Be7 7. f3 Qe1 8. a3 Qc1 9. Kf2 Qb1 10. Rh1 Qa2 11. Raf1 Kf8 12. Ke1 Bh4 13. Kd1 Bf2 14. Kc1 Bg1 15. Rd1 Qa1

R036 - Gianni Donati
1. d4 Na6 2. Be3 Nc5 3. dc5 Nf6 4. Qd6 Nd5 5. Qe6 Nb6 6. cb6 f5 7. Bc5 f4 8. e3 f3 9. Bb5 fg2 10. Nf3 g1=N 11. c4 Ne2 12. Nc3 Nd4 13. Rd1 Nc6 14. Rd6 Nb8 15. Rc6 d5 16. OO d4 17. Kg2 d3 18. Nd4 d2 19. f4 d1=N 20. f5 Nf2 21. f6 Ng4 22. Rf4 Nh6 23. Re4 Ng8 24. f7#

R037 - Jose A. Verdejo
1. d4 Nc6 2. Bh6 Nd4[+wPd2] 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. Qb1 Nh6[+wBc1] 5. Nd1 Ng8

R038 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. e3 g6 2. Qg4 Bh6 3. Qd7 Kf8 4. Qd4 Be3 5. Qh8 Bb6 6. Qf6 ef6 7. Ba6 f5 8. Ke2 Qf6 9. Kd3 Ba5 10. Kc4 b6 11. Kb3 Ba6

R039 - ?#8240;tienne Dupuis & Michel Caillaud
1. a4 e6 2. Ra3 Qf6 3. Rg3 Qc3 4. bc3 f5 5. Ba3 f4 6. Bc5 f3 7. Bb6 fg2 8. f4 gh1=B 9. Bh3 Be4 10. Nf3 ab6 11. Rg1 Ra5 12. Rh1 Rf5 13. a5 Bc5 14. a6 Bg1 15. a7 c5 16. a8=R Nc6 17. Rc8 Ke7 18. Ra8 Rf8 19. Ra1 Ra8

R040 - Satoshi Hashimoto
1. g4 e6 2. g5 Bb4 3. g6 Bc3 4. dc3 Ne7 5. Bg5 OO 6. Bf6 gf6 7. g7 d5 8. gf8=B d4 9. Bh6 d3 10. Bc1 Kg7 11. Kd2 Kg6 12. Ke3 d2 13. Ke4 dxc1=B 14. Qd4 Bh6 15. f4 Bf8

Problem Paradise 18, Apr.-June 2000

R030c - Thierry le Gleuher
1. h4 g5 2. hg5 Nc6 3. Rh7 Ne5 4. Rh6 Ng4 5. Rc6 Rh1 6. e3 Nh2 7. Qg4 dc6 8. Qa4 Bh3 9. d4 f5 10. Bd2 Kf7 11. Bb4 Kg6 12. Be7 Kh5 13. g6 Bh6 14. Bh4 Qh4 15. Bc4 Nf6 16. Ke2 Rh8 17. Bg8 Nh7